12th International Student Poster Presentation Conference
in English and American Studies

2022 - Abstracts

Opening ceremony: Monday, 25 April, 10:00 CEST
Closing ceremony: Friday, 29 April, 14:00 CEST

Please note that the times refer to CEST, Hungarian time.

BA section

Back to the main page.

Erdei Judit / Papp Júlia / Rácz Balázs

Eötvös Loránd University

Pedagogy meets Cognitive Linguistics: Measuring the efficacy of cognitive linguistic input in teaching phrasal verbs

The research was conducted in a comparative fashion in order to measure the efficacy of the cognitive linguistic way of explaining the seemingly unrelated meanings of the verbs that constitute a phrasal verb and how they form one coherent meaning in the compound, which is a particularly difficult part of English SLA. The research is based on Lakoff’s, and Kövecses’s theoretical framework and Rudzka-Ostyn’s guidebook about the applicability of cognitive linguistics in a second language class. The research was conducted in the Eötvös József Collegium in Mária Sántha’s English class; the students divided into two sub-groups were presented with 20 phrasal verbs in context, however, the Control group received phrasal verbs through drill exercises, while the Experimental group was given the Cognitive Linguistic explanation. The research was conducted in three phases, the students’ previous knowledge was examined in a pretest, then they were presented with the two methods of teaching phrasal verbs and in the posttests the two methods’ efficacy was compared. The importance of Kövecses’s statement that explicit Cognitive Linguistic explanations help the comprehension of linguistic problems and that through semantic transfer students might be able to use previously unknown elements were tested in the research.

Back to the main page.

Tóth Dániel

University of Miskolc

Requiem for a Dream - Film versus Novel

The topic of this presentation (and the paper it is based on) is a comparison of the titular novel and its movie version. The main goal is to prove why the film adaptation is a faithful conversion through an analysis using a combination of movie theory and scene analysis. This presentation will only cover the most important points, as it is just a fraction of the overall paper. There will be mention of book adaptation theory, specific example scene analysis and mention of the musical score. In order to prove why the movie is like the book it is based on, first the atmosphere of the book must be established, which will be the basis of this presentation. Once that has been established, I will make my case for why the movie is such a great conversion of the book, in more sense than one.

Back to the main page.

Ádám Tamás

University of Miskolc

The Scottish Independence Referendum of 2014

My paper for the 12th International Student Poster Presentation Conference (ISPPC) is related to the analysis of the 2014 Scottish Independence Referendum. The 2014 Scottish independence referendum was one of the greatest opportunities to achieve the long-awaited breakaway from the ties of the United Kingdom. Following the successful 1997 referendum that decided on Scottish devolution, the Scottish people had another chance to continue on their path to a fully independent state. But as we all know, the outcome of the 2014 independence referendum said otherwise. The main question I have focused on is this: "How is it that the Scottish people decided against independence, and who voted for it and who voted against it?" The goal and approach of the poster is to give a visual representation in the context of the events leading up to the referendum, show the results, analyse the vote, find reasons for the failure behind the referendum result, and finally draw a conclusion from the data and sources I found earlier.

Back to the main page.

Legény Anna / Lengyel Norbert

Eötvös Loránd University

Studying Children's Comprehension By Watching An Animated Film

The article titled Using Ferngully to Assess English Listening Comprehension in Children was written by Ellen Riojas Clark and Judy Linden. At the beginning of the article the authors share excerpts of those essays the students wrote as an assignment. Then, the writers detail the importance of choosing the proper listening exercises during the teaching process of children. Also, they summarise the aim of their study carried out in ESL classes in which they assessed Mexican immigrant pupils' listening comprehension skills. The film was not discussed by the students and their teachers before the children were asked to watch the film and there were no discussions arranged about its' topic after watching the movie either. In the article, the two author elaborates on why they had chosen a film titled Ferngully, and shares their classifications of words and visual clues upon which they analysed the comprehension skills of the students. Then, they summarise the attributions of those five groups to which they classified the pupils who took part in their study, based on their levels of comprehension skills. At the final part of the article, the authors detail the results of the experiment and the positive effect it had on the teachers' language teaching methods.

Back to the main page.

Dézsi Réka /Szalai Anna

Eötvös Loránd University

Teaching Adults: Is It Different?

The adult education literature generally supports the idea that teaching adults should be approached in a different way than teaching children and adolescents, groups sometimes referred to as preadults. The assumption that teachers of adults should use a style of teaching different from that used with preadults is based on "informed professional opinion; philosophical assumptions associated with humanistic psychology and progressive education; and a growing body of research and theory on adult learning, development, and socialization" (Beder and Darkenwald 1982, p. 143). Following a discussion of the major model underlying this assumption, this ERIC Digest examines research that investigates differences in these teaching styles and suggests considerations for practice. (Imel, 1989)

Back to the main page.

Csányi Evelyn / Sudár Alíz

Eötvös Loránd University

Teaching Adults: Is It Different?

The adult education literature generally supports the idea that teaching adults should be approached in a different way than teaching children and adolescents, groups sometimes referred to as preadults. The assumption that teachers of adults should use a style of teaching different from that used with preadults is based on "informed professional opinion; philosophical assumptions associated with humanistic psychology and progressive education; and a growing body of research and theory on adult learning, development, and socialization" (Beder and Darkenwald 1982, p. 143). Following a discussion of the major model underlying this assumption, this ERIC Digest examines research that investigates differences in these teaching styles and suggests considerations for practice.

Back to the main page.

P. Molnár-Szabó Laura / Tóth Zsófia

Eötvös Loránd University

Native and non-native: What can they offer? Lessons from team-teaching in Japan

This article discusses the contribution that joint instruction by a nativespeaking teacher and a non-native-speaking teacher can make to classroom language learning. By reviewing the last decade's team-teaching practice in Japanese secondary school EFL classrooms, it explores how two teachers with different linguistic and cultural backgrounds can work together to provide students with more opportunities to improve their communicative competence.e. The article suggests that team-teaching may be most effective when it is 'team-learning', in which all the participants, teachers as well as students, are encouraged to learn from one another by exchanging ideas or cultural values. By clarifying the notion of 'team teaching' and the nature of the 'team' itself, it is also able to propose ways in which the team could be reformulated to promote authentic communication in the classroom and so improve students' linguistic and interactional competencies.

Back to the main page.

Földházi Ágnes / Varga Veronika

Eötvös Loránd University

Teaching Adults: Is It Different?

To be considered a distinct profession with a unique knowledge base (Merriam 2001), the field of adult education advances the idea that teaching adults is different than teaching children. The subject of much debate, this issue has generated assumptions, opinions, and research. This publication takes a look at all three in discerning myths and realities associated with the teaching of adults.

Back to the main page.

Varga Vivien / Sárkány Veronika

Eötvös Loránd University

Using Ferngully to Assess English Listening Comprehension in Children

Jorge, Ana Laura, and Alberto, recently arrived Spanish-speaking immigrant chil- dren, are reflecting on a film in English called FernGully: The Last Rainforest (1992). This animated movie uses fairies and rainforest animals as characters to convey its theme of taking care of and preserving the natural environment. The film can be under- stood at different levels: from a basic theme that can be garnered from the visual informa- tion to the sophisticated theme of deforesta- tion that requires an understanding of abstract English words. We showed this film to the non-English-speaking Mexican chil- dren in the ESL classes as the stimulus for studying their English comprehension. Their descriptions of the movie range from those demonstrating no comprehension, to blow- by-blow accounts of the events, to complex discussions of the film’s theme.

Back to the main page.

Nemes Zsófia / Sári Szonja

Eötvös Loránd University

Teaching adults: Is it different?

To be considered a distinct profession with a unique knowledge base (Merriam 2001), the field of adult education advances the idea that teaching adults is different than teaching children. The subject of much debate, this issue has generated assumptions, opinions, and research. This presentation takes a look at discerning myths and realities associated with the teaching of adults.

Back to the main page.

Bíró Brigitta / Macher Máté

Eötvös Loránd University

Who to employ as a language teacher?

Among the trends which have recently emerged in ELT, two are challenged in this article. One trend suggests that researchers' attention should be focused on the learner rather than on the teacher. However, the implicit message of this article is that the road to the learner leads through the teacher and that teacher-related research should therefore be increased. The other trend attempts to get rid of the native speaker versus non-native speaker division, offering various alternative terms and concepts to replace it. I argue, however, that a non-native cannot aspire to acquire a native speaker's language competence. I also argue that, in ELT, native- and non-native-speaking teachers reveal considerable differences in their teaching behaviour and that most of the discrepancies are language-related. It does not follow from this, however, that non-native-speaking teachers are by definition less efficient. Indeed, I would contend that a deficient command of English may even have hidden advantages. The explicit message of this article is that natives and non-natives have an equal chance to become successful teachers, but the routes used by the two groups are not the same.

Back to the main page.

Horváth Magdolna Dóra / Horváth Irén Hanna

Eötvös Loránd University

Motivating revision of drafts through formative feedback

Process-oriented writing instruction stresses the value of between-draft revision. Yet current literature and traditional pedagogy have provided little guidance for motivating student writers to look beyond surface errors to develop and to refine their communicative intentions. Based on the assumption that this deep-level revision is most productive in terms of writing skills development, this paper suggests that teacher feedback with an inquiring stance engages student writers in negotiation over the emerging meaning of their texts. Sample draft compositions are used to explore the assumptions and implications of this instructional stance to student writing. Acknowledging the instructional context framing any assignment, the authors argue that addressing developing writers’ communicative purposes through an inquiring stance to early drafts motivates revision and thus creates opportunities for writing skills development.

Back to the main page.

Sata Réka / Dákai Anita

Eötvös Loránd University

Native and non-native teachers in team-teaching

This article discusses the contribution that joint instruction by a nativespeaking teacher and a non-native-speaking teacher can make to classroom language learning. By reviewing the last decade's team-teaching practice in Japanese secondary school EFL classrooms, it explores how two teachers with different linguistic and cultural backgrounds can work together to provide students with more opportunities to improve their communicative competence. The article suggests that team-teaching may be most effective when it is 'team-learning', in which all the participants, teachers as well as students, are encouraged to learn from one another by exchanging ideas or cultural values. By clarifying the notion of 'teamteaching' and the nature of the 'team' itself, it is also able to propose ways in which the team could be reformulated to promote authentic communication in the classroom and so improve students' linguistic and interactional competencies.

Back to the main page.

Dányi Eliza Anna / Kirtyán Fanni

Eötvös Loránd University

The google effect: Googling, Blogging, Wikis, and the Flattening of Expertise

As blogs continue to fill the Web with the bizarre daily rituals and opinions of people who we would never bother speaking to at a party, let alone invite into our homes, there has never been a greater need to stress the importance of intelligence, education, credentials and credibility. The problem is not only accuracy, but also the mediocrity initiated through the Google Effect. The concern is not with the banality of information – there has always been a plurality of sources in the analogue environment. The concern is the lack of literacy skills and strategies to sort the trash from the relevant.

Back to the main page.

Püsök Réka / Budai Botond

Eötvös Loránd University

The Google Effect

This article presents the consequences to librarians and teachers for the flattening of expertise, or the Google Effect. As blogs continue to fill the Web with the bizarre daily ritu- als and opinions of people who we would never bother speaking to at a party, let alone invite into our homes, there has never been a greater need to stress the importance of in- telligence, education, credentials and credibility. The prob- lem is not only accuracy, but also the mediocrity initiated through the Google Effect. The concern is not with the banality of information – there has always been a plurality of sources in the analogue environment. The concern is the lack of literacy skills and strategies to sort the trash from the relevant. This paper addresses not only the social choices about computer use and information literacy, but the intellectual choices we make in our professional lives as teachers and librarians. In such a time, the Google Effect raises stark questions about the value of reading, research, writing and scholarship.

Back to the main page.

Sándor Virág / Ballabás Dóra

Eötvös Loránd University

Class-Centered Approach To Language Learning

A study was conducted focusing on the different social development of eight classes of adult language learners. Data was extracted from observations and interviews with teachers and students. The result showed that teachers have to balance educational duties and social tasks. The latter is important because it helps establish a welcoming community within the class. In order to achieve this encouraging atmosphere, teachers used many creative ways to make learners feel comfortable, while also expanding their knowledge. There are several tasks that satisfy both aspects of teaching (brainstorming, collective answer checking etc.). The study proved that language learning in a cohesive group is more effective and it also contributes to students having better results.

Back to the main page.

Papp Júlia

Eötvös Loránd University

The concept of history in US Democratic political thinking

How do people imagine history? In my study, I am attempting to uncover common metaphors of the concept of history in US Democratic political news of the last decade with the tools and approach of Cognitive Linguistics. I compare my findings to George Lakoff’s Event Structure Metaphor, and argue that although some examples fit very well into the model he provided, it does not give an explanation for all the metaphors I have found. A common theme these metaphors suggest is that history is not something static and final, but something dynamic and ever-changing. One piece of evidence for this is the fact that two of the most common metaphors are HISTORY IS A PICTURE and HISTORY IS A BOOK, both of which suggest subjectivity and the possibly the intention of manipulation. In many cases, the frequent idea of manipulation can be connected to the theme of the articles (Donald Trump’s agenda to change the history curriculum, the Juneteenth and Black History Month, etc.). However, these issues are not always presented with “shaping metaphors”, and not all “shaping metaphors” are used to communicate the two aforementioned topics. This would suggest that they are part of a more general pattern in Democratic thinking.

Back to the main page.

Süle Dóra

Eötvös Loránd University

The conceptualization of anorexia nervosa

In my presentation, I would like to focus on metaphors that can help in conceptualizing anorexia nervosa with the help of Conceptual Metaphor Theory (Lakoff and Johnson, 1980). According to it, the conceptual system in the human mind is organised through metaphors which can influence our thinking and acts. In my research, I analysed YouTube videos which belong to the group of “anorexia recovery” videos in which the vloggers try to defeat this illness. Additionally, most of these are created by young girls aged between 16 and 25. (It is hard to find anorexic boys on the Internet, because this illness is more stigmatized among them.) In these cases, the metaphors used by the vloggers have important roles, because they could reflect on the experiences that they had with the disorder. Negative conceptualizations of anorexia appear more often in recovery vlogs because the patients can see and evaluate their disordered behaviour and their problems better than the ones who are still greatly influenced by the eating disorder. The preliminary results showed that the majority of the girls conceptualize anorexia as an AGRESSOR or a BULLY, while the second most common conceptualization is describing it as a bad VOICE in their head or as a part of their IDENTITY. However, there are some exceptional and special forms as well. My aim is to show and define what these expressions/metaphors mean in the anorexic thinking and why it is hard to cope with these thoughts.

Back to the main page.

Villám Vivien

Eötvös Loránd University

The sources and effects of language learning anxiety in public education

The aim of this poster presentation is to explore language learning anxiety and to present the topic in the field of public education that could often be responsible for students developing language anxiety. In short, it aims to shed a light on how complex phenomenon language anxiety is, and how to identify and manage it. The theoretical background that has been mainly established by Horwitz, Dewaele, Gregersen, Young, MacIntyre, Gardner etc. is going to be accompanied by contemporary empirical research findings to provide a practical perspective within national and international context as well. In order to help the reader to understand the topic, the poster presentation is going to start with listing its typical effects: nervousness, self-consciousness, freezing, underachieving, overstudying, or even skipping classes. However, the presentation is mainly structured by internal and external sources and within that the following suggested subcategories are going to be interpreted: personal and interpersonal anxieties, learner beliefs about language learning, instructor beliefs about language teaching, instructor-learner interactions, classroom procedures, and language testing. Nonetheless, the poster presentation is also going to include information about implications and suggestions concerning how to cope with debilitating anxiety and emphasising that modern psychology has influenced language anxiety research in many respects, eg. positive psychology, the importance of self-efficacy, or mindfulness.

Back to the main page.

Medve Brigitta

Miskolci Egyetem

Marriage as a Quest for Female Self-development in Jane Austen's Fiction

Marriage as a Quest for Female Self-development in Jane Austen's Fiction In my presentation, I will examine the heroine's quest for self-development in Jane Austen's fiction. Specifically, I will analyse how romantic relationships and marriages help or hinder individual development as described in the novel Sense and Sensibility. My paper focuses on the different ways in which different suitors or spouses promote or hinder female development. I will use a comparative analysis of mercenary and companionate marriages and relationships based on romantic idealism. I assume that the female quest for self-development begins with the emergence of suitors and that its subsequent course is strongly influenced by the type of relationship the heroine chooses. Each heroine has the option of beginning a new quest or changing the direction of her quest after the emotional and financial failure of the first relationship. The heroines have the opportunity to learn from these failures that contribute to better self-knowledge. Better self-knowledge helps them correct their mistakes. I will note that some women in Austen's fiction accept the social expectations of their time. The happy marriages are the result of the heroine's rejection of these expectations, but there is no happy marriage without a compromise, which the heroine often has to make. The heroine's ability to recognize when and how to make such compromises depends largely on her ability to learn from the mistakes she made in her first relationship.

Back to the main page.

Orendács Petra

Eötvös Loránd University

The Hero's Lover - Daisy Buchanan as Archetypes

My poster presentation will focus on Daisy Buchanan’s character from F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, and how she fits into the archetypes of the Maiden, the Temptress, and the Victim. I am going to use Joseph Campbell’s idea of the Hero’s Journey – it is generally admitted that Gatsby himself is a hero on a mission, but many forget to mention Daisy’s significance beyond her being another jewel in his crown. In the Hero’s Journey, the hero’s lover has great significance in his story and act as a symbol of his success. She represents the world, life and death – just like how romancing Daisy is a matter of all or nothing for Gatsby. If he does not get the girl, he fails in life. Who is the hero without his lover? But more importantly, who is the lover without the hero? Daisy’s complexity embraces the figure of the Maiden (in her younger years, and reliving them with Gatsby), the Temptress (as the object of his desire), and as the Victim (of the patriarchy, and again, Gatsby’s desire). In my poster presentation, I hope I will provide a new viewpoint on her character, and its significance.

Back to the main page.

Mészáros Bálint / Kovács Lili

Eötvös Loránd University - BTK

Ideologies values for British accents

This poster is based on the 2007 article written by Nikolas Coupland and Hywel Bishop. This article is based on a survey conducted by the authors, in which the espondents were asked the evaluate 34 accents of English spoken in Great Britain, based on prestige and social attractiveness, with additional questions regarding other information, such as proper speech and accent pride. With categories sex, age, region and diversity, Coupland and Bishop examined how the different groups in these categories completed the survey and contrasted their findings. They concluded with saying that they found the large scale survey benefitial, as the results came from a variety of sub-groups of people.

Back to the main page.

Jasik Dorottya / Illés Kinga

Eötvös Loránd University

Group dynamics

This paper highlights the importance of the dynamics of the learner group in shaping the L2 learning process. We argue that group characteristics and group processes significantly contribute to any success or failure in the L2 classroom, and therefore language teachers could potentially benefit from an awareness of the principles of group dynamics. First, we provide an overview of the aspects of classroom dynamics that we consider most relevant to L2 teaching. Then, based on the theoretical insights and our own teaching experience, we make practical suggestions for teachers on how to exploit the principles of group dynamics in their classrooms to good effect.

Back to the main page.

Németh Kristóf Marcell

Eötvös Loránd University

Conflicts inside and between the guilds of London.

When we learn about guilds in high school, we usually think of them as simply a small part of cities, and we don’t really learn about what they actually are. They are more than just a collection of craftsmen, they are more than just a relic of the past, they were a whole other world inside the city walls. Every single guild was unique in their own way, we can’t really talk about them collectively, yet we still do it to this day. As you might guess, these “worlds” within the city walls often collided with each other. They had their ambitions, they had their sphere of influence, and when these spheres were contested, they didn’t shy away from conflict, either political or physical. These clashes were especially fierce and well documented in London, where they not only had their unique guild system, with their Livery Guilds and ranking, which highly determined the daily life of a guild. In my research, I looked at how these guilds works and the conflicts between and inside these guilds. There have been many cases of armed conflicts between these companies, in which they battled to control certain areas of London, or London itself.

Back to the main page.

Magyari Dorottya / Magyari Krisztina

Eötvös Loránd University

Ideologies values for British accents

Our poster is about a study conducted by Nikolas Coupland and Hywel Bishop. The results are from a large online survey of 5010 U.K. informants’ reactions to 34 different accents of English, based on simple accent labels.


MA section

Back to the main page.

Varga Regina

Eötvös Loránd University

Racism in American Sports Teams' Names

With the renaming of the Washington Redskins – who for a period of time were known as the Washington Football Team – to the Washington Commanders, some other American sports teams have come under fire for the racist connotations and history of their team names. My research highlights these teams, such as the Chicago Blackhawks, the Atlanta Braves, and the Kansas City Chiefs. These teams are still heavily associated with Native American imagery. On the other hand, there are teams who – like the Washington Commanders – already changed their names, logos, and mascots to not include racist and offensive stereotypes of Native Americans, such as the Golden State Warriors or the Cleveland Guardians. The former changed their logo from a cartoon depiction of a Native American to the Golden Gate Bridge when the team moved home from Philadelphia to San Francisco in 1969. The latter first removed their logo, depicting a Native American chief, from their merchandise in 2018, and changed their name from Indians to Guardians in 2021. Although there are still teams in both the big leagues and on the collegiate level who have retained their racially insensitive connections, there is a current trend that brings about change in these matters.

Back to the main page.

Busi Dóra

Eötvös Loránd University

Is Incel Violence Terrorism? Examining the Radical Ideology of Elliot Rodger and the Incel Community

The involuntary celibate (incel) community continues to thrive on online forums. They believe that sexual access to a woman’s body is a right for every man, but through feminism, a new social order has developed in which women have the power to deprive incels of sex due to their lower status in the social hierarchy. This idea creates a narrative of incel victimhood, which, for the incel community, legitimizes violence against women and non-incel men. When looking at instances of incel violence a deeper ideological purpose is apparent, as violence motivated by revenge for social exclusion implies an underlying aim of changing the current sociopolitical order. Incels’ goal is to restore a “traditional” society in which women are subjugated. These inherent political goals and the similarities between the ideologies and radicalization processes of right-wing and religious extremists and incels give reason to think of incel violence as terrorism. Comparing the manifesto of Elliot Rodger–who incels have claimed as their martyr–with Alex P. Schmid’s academic consensus definition of terrorism, I argue that incel violence not only can but should be classified as terrorism.

Back to the main page.

Oleksandr Reient

Eötvös Loránd University

The impact of computer-mediated learning on students' information navigation skills

The development of computer technology has made human life better, allowing people to communicate virtually, collect digital currency, work from home, and, of course, has made it possible to study and learn online, leaving more space for self-development. In the Covid-19 situation, various online platforms such as Moodle, Microsoft Teams, different Google services, Canvas and others are widely used by various educational institutions, from elementary schools to universities. This presumably means that students can use their information navigation skills to find, select, determine what is relevant and what is not, download, etc. on a daily basis as they have to learn online without other options. Thus, it has been decided to investigate the impact of computer-mediated learning on students' information navigation skills. It must be established whether classes requiring online learning using the previously mentioned online platforms have a positive effect on students' online information searching skills. In this study, the extent to which computer-mediated learning in and out of the classroom affects students' skills in finding reliable sources, identifying relevant information, evaluating and narrowing it down, considering authorship has been examined. In order to obtain the necessary data, a quantitative approach has been used to answer the following research question: How does computer-mediated learning affect students’ information navigation skills? The participants are master's degree students in Applied Linguistics at Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest, Hungary.

Back to the main page.

Harangozó Lili Eszter

Eötvös Loránd University

Using literature in the English classroom to facilitate Social and Emotional Learning

Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) is not only a substantial part of education but also of personality development (CASEL, n.d.). In school environments, most people agree that children should be raised to be “knowledgeable, responsible and caring” (Elias et al., 1997). What is not realised though is how SEL can enhance all these components. Through SEL, students can learn to understand and express the social and emotional states of their lives and manage them successfully (Elias et al., 1997). As McKay (1982) suggests, literature has many benefits in ESL classes. It is not only useful for developing linguistic skills, but it also increases students’ motivation and their cultural sensitivity. Based on this, the poster presents the findings of a classroom study, in the framework of which, literary works were integrated into secondary school EFL lessons involving the principles of SEL. In the lessons that were held in secondary schools, different pieces of literature were discussed, involving a multitude of poems discussing the topic of love, chapters from a book that dealt with autism spectrum disorder and so on. Students had the chance to deepen their emotional maturity and social responsibility, reflect on the discussed pieces, draw conclusions, and apply their findings to their own lives – this included classroom environment as well as their everyday existence. The overall goal of this research is to prove the importance of SEL even further, but this is to be executed with a twist, so it shows how the world of literature incorporated into the classroom can cultivate students’ emotions and world views. Fundamentals of SEL. (n.d.). CASEL. Retrieved March 10, 2022, from https://casel.org/fundamentals-of-sel/ Elias, M. J., Zins, J. E., Weissberg, R. P., Frey, K. S., Greenberg, M. T., Haynes, N. M., Kessler, R., Schwab-Stone, M. E., & Shriver, T. P. (1997). Promoting Social and Emotional Learning: Guidelines for educators (1st ed., Vol. 1). Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. McKay, S. (1982). Literature in the ESL Classroom. TESOL Quarterly, 16(4), 529–536. https://doi.org/10.2307/3586470

Back to the main page.

Szűcs Adél

Eötvös Loránd University

The appearance and development of intercultural competence in the EFL classroom in Hungary

In my poster presentation and upcoming thesis I am intending to investigate how intercultural competence appears in Hungarian EFL classrooms and what English teachers do to improve this competence. Teaching intercultural competence has been a major issue in the field of teaching culture in EFL classrooms. The term intercultural competence derives from intercultural communication. According to Lustig and Koster (1999), intercultural communication means the capacity and ability to enter other cultures and communicate effectively and appropiately, establish and maintain relationships. In my research I will be interested to discover how Hungarian teachers of English define intercultural competence e.g. does it only cover teaching about cultural traditions regarding celebrations like Easter? What are they planning to use culture for? Do they want to sensitise children about the status of Indigenous peoples or other ethnic minorities? I would like to examine how intercultural competence appears in EFL classrooms during my short and long-term teaching practice by observing English lessons, teachers’ attitudes towards the topic and how they are trying to enhance this field of competence e.g. via communication, different written/ oral tasks or project works. My research will be based on both qualitative and quantitative research instruments, like interviews, questionarries, tests and feedback.

Back to the main page.

Afroz Parvin Sultana

RABINDRA BHARATI UNIVERSITY

The Holocaust Trio: Sylvia Plath

Sylvia Plath (1932-1963), an American Confessional poet, used images that reflected intense psychological experiences, often culled from childhood or battles with mental illness or breakdown. The Holocaust, also known as the Shoah, was the World War 2 genocide of the European Jews. Between 1941 and 1945, across German occupied Europe, Nazi Germany and its collaborators systematically murdered some six millions Jews, around two-thirds of Europe's Jewish population. The Holocaust trio of Sylvia Plath includes 'Daddy', 'Lady Lazarus', and 'Mary's Song'. Holocaust imagery appears only in the poems she wrote between October and November 1962, just after her separation from Ted Hughes and her return from Devon to London. This timing can make it difficult not to feel that she distastefully used the persecution of the Jews to express her own feelings of being victimized by Hughes. More specifically, Plath is adamant in her letters to her mother at this time that "I need no literary help from him. I am going to make my own way." Hughes was undeniably a powerful literary influence on Plath, and his departure may well have enabled her to use the sorts of topical imagery which he generally felt were better avoided. I am going to present how Plath used the Holocaust imagery in her trio with a deeper analysis on her psyche.


PhD - English and American history, English speaking cultures and English and American literature section

Back to the main page.

Vass Eszter

University of Konstanz

Metatheatre and Traumatic Memory in The Authorised Kate Bane by Ella Hickson

In this project I will examine The Authorised Kate Bane by contemporary British playwright Ella Hickson in the context of metatheatricality and trauma theory. The play is structured around a play-within-the-play, written/staged/directed by the titular character, in which a fictional, highly subjective meeting between her boyfriend and her parents is explored, in anticipation of the real event the next day. Working with Dominick LaCapra’s theory of acting-out and working-through as responses to traumatic memory, I will examine how trauma manifests in the play and how a self-reflexive dramaturgy uses the tools of the theatre to reveal unacknowledged, unconscious past trauma. Within the inner play, Kate contends with having had a privileged upbringing seemingly unconducive to a traumatic experience, yet having been burdened and affected by her parents’ separation and her father’s emotional instability, insecurity, fear of loss, and feelings of inferiority. The play stages the conflict between Kate’s self-conscious denial of a traumatic past and a self-reflexive dramaturgy through which Kate is acting out her memories in order to work through them, or in other words, staging a trauma response that attempts to deconstruct itself through its process of creation.

Back to the main page.

Linszky Franciska

Eötvös Loránd University

The Passing of Arthur in Victorian Visual Arts

"He passes to be King among the dead, And after healing of his grievous wound He comes again” 19th century England was imbued with Victorian morality, therefore a growing need for moral examples arose. A significant amount of attention was paid to mediaeval chivalric code; thus, King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table were once again in the focal point. This revival is also indebted to the poet laurate Alfred Tennyson (1809-1892), whose Idylls of the King is probably the most important retelling of the Arthurian legend. This presentation seeks to explore the Tennysonian poem The Passing of Arthur as reflected in contemporary Victorian visual arts. Firstly, I strive to unveil the reasons of Arthur’s death being a popular theme to depict, moreover, why the Victorian mindset resonated with Arthur’s character and the surrounding myth. Then, I attempt to identify the salient common features that characterize the visual interpretations, including the works of Daniel Maclise, Joseph Noel Paton, James Archer, Edward Burne-Jones and Julia Margaret Cameron, and shed light on how the artists translated words into pictures.


PhD - Applied linguistics and Language pedagogy section

Back to the main page.

Vuong Thi Hoan

Eötvös Loránd University

Motivations for technology integration in EFL teaching: An exploratory study of primary school teachers in underprivileged areas of Vietnam.

Ryan and Deci (2017) argued that humans can be driven to behave by the perceived values of the behavior or a certain extrinsic force. Motivation is assumed to be a factor guiding and energizing people’s behaviors (Feldman, 2017). This study aimed to investigate what motivates primary school teachers in underprivileged areas of Vietnam to integrate ICT in their EFL teaching. Seven participants from different primary schools in Daklak, a mountainous province, were recruited to take part in one-on-one interviews which lasted 30 to 40 minutes. The interview guide was constructed by the researcher and sent to experts for feedback. Interviews were carried out in Vietnamese on Skype platform. They were videotaped and transcribed afterwards. Relevant parts of interviews were translated into English. The findings revealed four categories of motivations including teacher-related motives, student-related motives, accessibility-related motives and user-friendliness of ICT. Apart from several emerging stimulations, the outcomes of the investigation also echoed the findings of previous studies (e.g., Surry & Land, 2000; Baek et al., 2008; Sharma & Srivastava, 2009; Schulz et al., 2015). A number of specific implications were suggested for school leaders to motivate primary school teachers’ ICT use in EFL teaching.

Back to the main page.

Thet Oo Khaing

Eötvös Loránd University

Integrated assessment task analysis: A guided summary writing task

In academic settings where English is used as a second language or foreign language, integrated language assessment has gained its popularity in measuring learners’ language ability, especially in high-stakes language testing. In the context of writing assessment, the use of integrated tasks is considered to have more authenticity, fairness and a positive washback on both teaching and learning (Gebril, 2018). Despite this, it has been found that research in integrated writing assessment is still limited compared to other areas of assessment. Bachman and Palmer (2010) proposed a framework of language task characteristics based on five aspects of task. Using this framework, this paper mainly reports on a detailed analysis of the characteristics of a guided summary writing task used in an Academic Skills Test designed for undergraduate students at a university in Hungary, as well as a brief discussion on whether the task matches the definition of an integrated assessment, specifically reading-into-writing assessment. The findings proved that the characteristics of the guided summary writing task match those of the target language use (TLU), which means that it fits in the TLU domain and can be used as a good measure of learners’ writing ability.

Back to the main page.

Kübra Yetis

Eötvös Loránd University

Exploring Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Turkish Pre-Service English as a Foreign Language Teachers: A Mixed-Methods Approach

Teacher self-efficacy is of great significance in teachers’ willingness, dedication, motivation to teaching, and student achievement and motivation for learning (Tschannen-Moran & Woolfolk Hoy, 2001). Regarding this, the current study attempts to investigate the self-efficacy beliefs of Turkish pre-service English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers (N=119) majoring in the Foreign Language Education Department at a state university in Turkey. Data were collected through the Turkish version of the Teachers’ Sense of Efficacy Scale, originally developed by Tschannen-Moran & Woolfolk Hoy (2001) and adapted into Turkish by Çapa et al. (2005). Also, semi-structured interviews with 12 participants were applied for a deeper understanding of the participants’ perceptions of teacher self-efficacy. The findings showed that Turkish pre-service EFL teachers had relatively high levels of self-efficacy beliefs in general and for classroom management, student engagement, and instructional strategies subdimensions. However, one-way ANOVA demonstrated no significant difference in the self-efficacy beliefs of the participants in terms of grade level. On the other hand, the qualitative findings revealed that the fourth and third-grade pre-service EFL teachers had reasonably higher self-efficacy beliefs in the teaching profession compared to the first and second-graders. The implications highlight the crucial role of teacher education programs in enhancing pre-service teacher self-efficacy.

Back to the main page.

Spissich Boglárka

Eötvös Loránd University

Using Netflix, Instagram, and TikTok in EFL learning: Students' opinion

With the help of different online platforms and social media, EFL learners can easily access content created in authentic English. The present study explores how useful Hungarian teenagers find Netflix, Instagram, and TikTok in EFL learning. 101 students, aged between 12 and 17, from the same secondary school were asked with the help of an online questionnaire about their habits of using the given platforms, as well as their beliefs on their usefulness in EFL learning. The poster will exhibit five constructs of the used questionnaire: explicit learning, implicit learning, implicit vocabulary acquisition, listening skills improvement, and implicit grammar learning. Results showed that learners are mainly intrinsically motivated to use the applications, almost exclusively for entertainment. This means that they almost never engage in explicit learning using the applications. However, they acknowledge that their EFL knowledge implicitly benefits from using the platforms. Students believe that all three applications are most advantageous for vocabulary enhancement. It was followed by listening skills improvement in case of Netflix and TikTok, while Instagram seems to be more useful for implicit grammar learning. Finally, it was concluded that those who had been learning English for more than five years noticed more improvement in their EFL skills when watching films in English. In case of the social media applications, it was shown that females found them more useful.

Back to the main page.

Aicha Rahal

Pazmany Peter Catholic University

Designing and Validating a Questionnaire on Tunisians’ Perceptions of Language Policy and the Promotion of English in Higher Education

The suggested poster aims to present the structure of a questionnaire on Tunisians’ perceptions of language policy and the promotion of English in higher education and to clarify the validation process of the developed questionnaire. The study addresses the following research questions: 1) What are Tunisian university teachers’ and students’ perceptions towards the uses of English and the reasons behind using it in higher education? 2) What are Tunisian university teachers’ and students’ perceptions towards the promotion of the status of English and its use as a Medium of Instruction in higher education? 3) What are the regulations that need to be taken by the Tunisian government and the ministry of higher education to promote the status of English, according to the participants? To find answers to these research questions and to achieve the objectives of this study, a questionnaire is used as the primary data collection instrument. The procedure of developing the questionnaire is based on Dornyei’s (2007) stages which include these main parts: 1) title; 2) general introduction; 3) specific instructions; 4) questionnaire items and 5) thanking. The questionnaire consists of three main parts: background information, closed-ended questions and open-ended questions. In the piloting process, the researcher used the think aloud protocol to test the content validity of the questionnaire and Cronbach’s Alpha was used to test the internal consistency of questionnaire items. Keywords: Questionnaire, Tunisian perceptions, design, validity, reliability. References Dornyei, Z. (2007). Research methods in applied linguistics: Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methodologies. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Back to the main page.

Marzban Sheida

University of Pannonia

The effect of intersemiotic relations on L2 reading process

The present research seeks to investigate the cognitive processes second language learners go through to read multimodal texts of different image-language relations and study which image-language relation builds a stronger visual or verbal mental representation of the text. In the present work we focus our attention to the image-subordinate-to-language and language-subordinate-to-image relations (Martinec & Salway, 2005) of visual and verbal representations of meaning. To do so, 79 Hungarian participants with A2-B1 English language proficiency attend the research to read and respond to an online multimodal reading test instrument to gather data, which is completed with data collected from an eye-tracking system. The findings reveal that not all intersemiotic relations lead to a stronger mental model of multimodal texts. Readers move between the modes, evaluate modal load and identify the relation which allow them to construct their meaningful reading path. The present research may contribute to develop a more comprehensive model of L2 multimodal and multimedia learning.

Back to the main page.

Rommel Anna

Eötvös Loránd University

Covid-19 - An Unexpected Journey. Exploring Metaphorical Representations of Covid-19 among the medical professionals

Since December 2019 Covid-19 has spread throughout the world at a dangerously fast pace and soon become a global pandemic. The virus, which is often talked about metaphorically, is the most frequently discussed subject nowadays. Many linguists have investigated the metaphorical conceptualizations of the virus; nevertheless, no research is available on the conceptualization of Covid-19 among doctors. Hence, the present paper investigates the metaphorical conceptualization of Covid-19 among medical professionals. Furthermore, the paper compares the doctors' conceptualizations of the virus to those of laypeople (office workers) and offers a detailed elaboration on the differences in metaphor usage in two sample groups.